Jesus’ love can and does conquer addictions

Addictions

Addictions are something that plagues many people today, whether addiction to food, sex, drugs, alcohol, smoking, spending, masturbation, porn, etc. Some inexperienced deliverance ministers might go after a spirit of addiction, which may bring freedom, but more often than not, it doesn’t bring lasting freedom. Many times there is a root that needs to be pulled up, along side casting out any residing spirits that are holding the person in bondage to the addiction. Getting to the root of the addiction is the key to bringing a person lasting genuine freedom. I am going to address the most common roots to addictions, and hopefully give you an idea of how this particular type of bondage works so that you can minister lasting freedom to those caught up in this type of bondage.

We are all created with a basic need to be loved. God created us to both give and receive love, but though damaged emotions, our capacity to receive love can be dramatically hindered. Ignorance of God’s love will also hinder us from receiving the great and glorious love that He has for us. The root of most addictive behaviors is a lack of love being received by that person. Many of us have been damaged emotionally by rejection, abandonment, abuse, etc., and thereby our capacity to receive love has been reduced. Only an emotionally healthy person is capable of both giving and receiving love as God intended.

Self-worth issues can hinder love

Self-worth issues are rooted in believing that we are not worthy or deserve to be loved. When we believe that we are unlovable, we will unconsciously reject any love that comes our way. We won’t believe the love, because we believe in our hearts that we are not worthy. Self worth issues are all rooted in our failing to see who we really are in Christ.

Many times, we have self-unforgiveness issues because we blame ourselves for something, or we’ve done something we deeply regret, and we simply cannot let it go. We need to realize that Jesus has forgiven us of all our failures, and we need to start seeing ourselves as forgiven. Otherwise, we’re denying the work of Christ in our life! If God forgave you, and you’re still beating yourself up, then you don’t really believe what Jesus did for you. It’s that simple!

Just as we must forgive others (see Matthew 18:21-35), we need to forgive ourselves just the same. Self-hate has been known to be the root behind diseases such as lupus and Crohn’s disease, as well as other auto-immune diseases. We need to stop holding ourselves accountable for that which Jesus has set us free from.

If we want to be in faith, we need to BELIEVE what Jesus did for us, and part of that believing is seeing ourselves as forgiven and clothed with the righteousness of God, which is upon all who believe in the finished work of Christ. Without faith, it is impossible to please God (see Hebrews 11:6), so if you want to please God, start taking the finished work of the cross seriously, and begin to see yourself as forgiven, washed clean, and clothed in the righteousness of God. For the righteousness (right standing with God) is upon all who believe:

“Even the righteousness of God which is by faith of Jesus Christ unto all and upon all them that believe…” (Romans 3:22 KJV)

Unforgiveness is rooted in a lack of realization of how much God has forgiven us, and therefore we’re not thankful for the steep and terrible price that Jesus paid for our own failures. This is why it is so important to mediate on what Jesus did for us, until it transforms our heart. The message of Jesus’ work for us is what causes faith to arise in our hearts and transforms us from the inside out (read Romans 10:8-17).

Learning to see yourself as God sees you and forgive yourself because you want to please God and be in faith and be thankful for what Jesus did for you, is the biggest step in overcoming self-worth issues. Of course, there are spirits that may need to be driven out as well, such as self-hate, guilt, condemnation, etc.

Receiving the love God has for us

When it comes to God’s love for us, that’s very obvious, considering how He loves even the sinner so much that Jesus came to die for them. Anybody who knows the message of the cross, has some knowledge of God’s love for us. However, many times, we blame God for our problems, and so we don’t believe the love that He has for us. Not only do we blame Him for our problems, many times we think that God gave us the sickness or problem in our life to teach us something. Nothing could be further from the truth! Jesus tells us clearly who came to kill, steal, and destroy, and who came so that we could have life and have it in abundance.

“The thief cometh not, but for to steal, and to kill, and to destroy: I am come that they might have life, and that they might have it more abundantly.” (John 10:10 KJV)

If we are going to receive the love that God has for us, we need to get our thinking straightened out. He’s not the one behind our problems, but rather Jesus paid the full price so that we can be forgiven all our sins, both physically and emotionally healed, and blessed.

“When the even was come, they brought unto him many that were possessed with devils: and he cast out the spirits with his word and healed all that were sick: That it might be fulfilled which was spoken by Esaias the prophet, saying, Himself took our infirmities, and bare our sicknesses.” (Matthew 8:16-17 KJV)

Look at how good God’s heart is toward mankind! Not only did Jesus heal them, but He proved the blessings of the covenant we have with Him today concerning our healing and deliverance. Isn’t He good toward us? The reason why bad things happen to us, is because we live in a fallen world that is under the control of the evil one. It’s not God’s fault. He loves you. Jesus died for you.

Settling the fact that God loves you and is good toward you is crucial to restoring your God-given capacity to receive His love. If you can’t receive His love, then you need to stop and ask yourself four questions:

  1. Am I blaming God for anything bad that happened to me?
  2. Have I been emotionally wounded in such a way that it is hindering my ability to freely receive love as God intended me to?
  3. Do I have knowledge and revelation of how much God loves me? Do I have a solid Biblical understanding of how I am loved with the same kind of love that the Father has for Jesus?
  4. Is there a self-worth issue that makes me feel unworthy to be loved?

Settling these issues lays a foundation for breaking free from the power of addictions. You must repair the damage and faulty thinking which hinders your ability to receive the love that God has for you.

How do you know if you are receiving God’s love or if it’s hindered? If you are not passionate about Jesus, then somewhere your ability to receive His love is hindered.

If you are living a life without receiving God’s love in your heart on a daily bases, you are missing out on the most fulfilling life you can have here on this earth. To know God’s love, which surpasses all understanding (see Philippians 4:7), dispels all our fears and gives us a sense of peace and joy that we could never otherwise know.

“And we have known and believed the love that God hath to us. God is love; and he that dwelleth in love dwelleth in God, and God in him. Herein is our love made perfect, that we may have boldness in the day of judgment: because as he is, so are we in this world. There is no fear in love; but perfect love casteth out fear: because fear hath torment. He that feareth is not made perfect in love.” (1 John 4:16-18 KJV)

What exactly is an addiction?

An addiction is formed when we try to use something other than God, to meet our need to be loved. When our ability to receive God’s love into our hearts is hindered, we will feel like something is missing, and seek to fill that void with something else. When that thing, whatever it might be, fills that void, we grow to love it because it’s meeting a need. Over time, we establish a relationship with that thing, and when it comes time to depart, it’s like breaking up a relationship. That’s why addictions are so addicting; we’ve relied on that thing to meet a need and we’ve established a relationship with it. Now when it’s time to break up the love, it isn’t so easy to say goodbye.

See yourself as lovable!

The key in uprooting most addictions is to deal with the underlying issues which are limiting their capacity to freely receive love from God and others, along with dealing with any self-worth issues by establishing an understanding of your true identity in Christ. Coming to a place where you believe you are lovable is key to receiving love in general, so dealing with self-worth issues is an important key to breaking down the walls which keep us from feeling loved. The only way to obtain a true sense of worth and value is to get a revelation of how much you are loved by God the Father, who sent His son Jesus to die for you.

Discovering the root

To discover the root of your addiction, you need to get real honest with yourself. Many times, we are in denial about the pain we are feeling. Figuring out what the root of a bondage is all about asking the right questions, and that is especially important when it comes to uprooting an addiction. Why don’t we feel loved? Do we feel unlovable? (Let’s stop right there; if we feel unlovable, then you’ve just discovered a self-worth issue that will need to be addressed.) Are you passionate about Jesus? If not, then something in hindering you from realizing how much you are loved by Him who died for you. Do you see yourself as forgiven and loved by the Father because of what Jesus did for you?

As you discover emotional wounds, you’ll need to forgive (others, yourself, and God) and invite Jesus to come and heal the damage in your heart. If you don’t realize how much God loves you, then you’ll need to spend some time learning about what Jesus did for you on the cross, and what a terrible price He paid because He loved you so very much. Often breaking out of an addiction is a combination of emotional healing, learning about who you are in Christ, forgiving (yourself, others, and God), overcoming self-worth issues by changing how you see yourself (in light of how God sees and loves you), and casting out any spirits that came in and are enforcing the addictive behavior. Spirits behind guilt, condemnation, etc. also need to be driven out, as they seek to keep us from fully seeing what Jesus did for us on the cross.

Dealing with the issues underlying an addiction is key to uprooting it permanently. If you want lasting freedom and wholeness in this area of your life, you will have to deal with the issues that have limited your capacity to receive love, especially the love that God has for you.

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Breaking the Codependent Cycle

Do you say yes when you really want to say no? Do you “walk on eggshells” around certain people, believing you can control their emotions? Do you think you must have solutions for other people’s problems?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, you may be codependent.

Codependent literally means “dependent with.” People can become “dependent with,” or on, a substance, such as alcohol or drugs; a behavior, such as irregular eating or compulsive shopping; or other people, such as a spouse or adult child.

How does codependency develop?

All humans are born with basic needs. Our physical needs—food, water and shelter—are obvious. Our emotional needs—love, acceptance and significance—are less apparent but just as important to our development. If we are deprived of these basic love needs, we are affected for the rest of our lives.

If you were born into an emotionally healthy family, your love needs were probably met. However, if you were born to parents who themselves were deprived of love, it’s very likely your needs were not met, either.

Alcohol- or drug-addicted parents, for example, are often unavailable to their children both emotionally and physically. The parent who is not addicted is so immersed in the addict and his problems that she has little ability to meet the love needs of the children. The emotionally deprived children often become codependent adults, struggling through life with what Hemfelt, Minirth and Meier refer to in their book Love Is a Choice as an “empty love tank.”

“In a normal, functional family,” they write, “love is transmitted from generation to generation, poured down from parents to children.” If this does not happen, codependency, “a condition that results when love tanks are running on empty,” can occur.

 The Codependent Response

How can you tell if you, or someone you love, is codependent? There are a variety of behavioral patterns you can watch for.

Codependents try to fill their emotional voids with people, behaviors and things. Feeling empty inside and unhappy with their lives, codependents use people, behaviors and things to control or medicate inner feelings such as fear, unresolved anger or loneliness.

In a family in which one spouse has an alcohol or drug addiction, the other spouse is frequently dependent upon the person with the addiction. The non-addicted spouse sees the addict as “needing to be taken care of” and assumes responsibility for the addict’s feelings, thoughts and behaviors.

Codependents have a tendency to control. In an effort to control their own emotions, codependents try to control the emotions and behaviors of those around them. What they can’t control, they worry about.

Codependents are motivated by the idea that if they could only get their partners to change, their problems would be solved. Their belief is that others can “make” them angry, happy or sad.

Accompanying the need to control is the feeling of fear. Codependents often fear another’s retaliation physically, emotionally or mentally. They also are paralyzed by thoughts of being abandoned and left alone to handle life’s issues. They minimize their problems, trying to believe the lie that “things aren’t really so bad.”

Codependents become so enmeshed in another’s life and problems that they lose their own sense of identity and self-worth. Constantly looking to others for validation, codependents seek approval at all costs and will do whatever is necessary to please others. The wife of a sex addict may be extremely cautious about crossing her husband, for example, because she fears that if she makes him mad, he’ll look at pornography.

Codependents often lack the ability to set clear boundaries—not knowing when to say yes and when to say no to themselves and others. Fuzzy boundaries are a symptom of low self-esteem. They stem from negative thought patterns such as “If I say no, they won’t like me.” Such constant devaluing prevents an accurate assessment of true strengths and weaknesses, which is the basis for healthy self-esteem and the key to setting healthy boundaries.

Codependents excuse, tolerate and cover up the bad behavior of the person they are dependent upon, even when it is habitual or extreme. Have you ever known a wife who “calls in sick” for an alcoholic spouse with a hangover, or a husband who continues to make the payments on credit card accounts for a spouse who’s a compulsive shopper? Codependents enable rather than help correct the bad behavior.

Finding the Source of the Problem

The issues connected with codependency are so complex that helping a codependent through the healing process is difficult. I usually begin by identifying what the factors were, from active abuse to subtle neglect, that prevented the person’s love needs from being met. I determine how these painful events affected him in the past and how they are affecting him now. Then I help him come to terms with his past and begin to make better choices for the present and future by showing him how to work through the grief process (denial, anger, depression, bargaining and acceptance).

One common hindrance to the healing process is the codependent’s stubborn defense of his dysfunctional family-of-origin. Often a codependent will pretend things “weren’t that bad” and find looking inward very painful. I often hear, “My parents did the best they could.”

Though that may be true, it is necessary for the codependent to see that suppression of a painful past has resulted in his present problems. If he wants to complete the grieving process and receive the healing he so desperately needs, he has to get out of denial.

When codependents refuse to face the reality that past events have hurt them, they “re-create” the past by repeating patterns of behavior under a compulsion to fix their dysfunctional families. In psychology we refer to this as “unfinished business.”

For example, if the emotional needs (love, acceptance, significance) of a daughter were not met because her father was caught up in sexual addiction, she likely will re-create her childhood by marrying a man who is a sex addict in order to “finish the business” of getting her love needs met. The result, of course, is only the perpetuation of unmet needs.

In facing the “unfinished business” of our pasts, we do not blame or attack our parents. The goal is to try to understand how the way we were raised has affected and may still be affecting us.

Getting Free

As with all of life’s challenges, the solutions to codependency are found in God’s Word. The Bible tells us in Genesis 1:27 that “God created man in His own image” (NIV). It goes on to say, “God saw all that He had made, and it was very good” (v. 31).

This passage of Scripture is telling us that our “original” family-of-origin is God’s family and that we, a part of what God created, are “very good.” We are not forever bound by an earthly family’s dysfunctions when we realize who our true Father is! This is good news for the codependent.

The only perfect parent is our Father God, the one who created us. As we come to know Him, we learn to trust Him to meet our deepest inner needs, and we exchange the chaos of our lives for His peace.

The apostle John tells of a Samaritan woman who had been with six different men in an attempt to have her innermost emotional needs met. It was only when Jesus introduced her to her true Father that she came to realize all her needs could be met in Him (see John 4:14).

Like the Samaritan woman, the codependent must learn some things about God: that His love is unfailing, that He never abandons us, that He is patient and kind, even when we make mistakes, that He always tells the truth, that He always keeps His promises, that He always listens and acts on our behalf—and most of all, that He accepts us just as we are and considers us beautiful.

The Bible’s help to those who feel the need to control others is self-control, which is a fruit of the Spirit (see Gal. 5:22). God’s grace enables us to live self-controlled lives (see Titus 2:11-12). The apostle Paul tells us in 1 Cor. 6:12 that he “will not be mastered by anything.” Like him, when we are in control of our own feelings and behaviors, we can give to others out of a position of strength, not weakness.

Note that doing someone a favor is not a sign of codependency. Doing good when you freely choose to do it is from godly strength. But doing for others what we cannot do, do not wish to do or cannot afford to do is motivated by weakness and is not of God.

Dealing with unclear boundaries and low self-esteem becomes easier when we know who we are in Christ. Then we do not base our success on the acceptance or approval of others.

Jesus did not struggle with His identity. He knew exactly who He was (see John 4:25-26). We need not struggle with our identity or purpose, either. First Peter 2:9 declares that we “are a chosen people, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people belonging to God, that [we] may declare the praises of Him who called [us] out of darkness into His wonderful light.”

Knowing who we are in Christ makes us powerful in Him. In Colossians 2:9 we read, “For in Christ all the fullness of the Deity lives in bodily form, and you have been given fullness in Christ, who is head over every power and authority.”

In Christ, we are children of God (see 1 John 3:1). We have His attributes and strengths within us. That means we do not have to fear anyone or anything.

We are free to say no without feeling guilty and yes without feeling angry. We are not constrained by fear of abandonment or retaliation. We are able to confront others in a loving, yet powerful manner. And if they respond negatively, we can hold them accountable with godly consequences.

Breaking free from codependency begins with learning the facts about it and getting help. Codependency will not improve over time. Even if circumstances appear to be better for a season, happiness will be incomplete and temporary.

Extreme codependency can lead to severe depression and even suicide, as well as increasingly poor physical health, especially if addictions to substances are involved. Wounds from the past will become strongholds for pain, bitterness and unforgiveness. And the lives of innocent victims may be in danger.

If you are involved with someone who is codependent, seek professional help. Educate yourself. Read books. Attend support groups. Remember, you are not powerful enough to change anyone—only God can do that. It is the Son who sets us free (see John 8:36.)

But He is more than able to accomplish what needs to be performed—to sanctify the codependent “through and through” and to keep his spirit, soul and body “blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ” (1 Thess. 5:23). “The one who calls you is faithful,” the Bible says, “and He will do it” (v. 24).

 

Are You Codependent?

Do you say yes when you really want to say no? Do you “walk on eggshells” around certain people, believing you can control their emotions? Do you think you must have solutions for other people’s problems?

If you answered yes to any of these questions, you may be codependent.

Codependent literally means “dependent with.” People can become “dependent with,” or on, a substance, such as alcohol or drugs; a behavior, such as irregular eating or compulsive shopping; or other people, such as a spouse or adult child.

How does codependency develop?

All humans are born with basic needs. Our physical needs–food, water and shelter–are obvious. Our emotional needs–love, acceptance and significance–are less apparent but just as important to our development. If we are deprived of these basic love needs, we are affected for the rest of our lives.

If you were born into an emotionally healthy family, your love needs were probably met. However, if you were born to parents who themselves were deprived of love, it’s very likely your needs were not met, either.

Alcohol- or drug-addicted parents, for example, are often unavailable to their children both emotionally and physically. The parent who is not addicted is so immersed in the addict and his problems that she has little ability to meet the love needs of the children. The emotionally deprived children often become codependent adults, struggling through life with what He felt, Minirth and Meier refer to in their book Love Is a Choice as an “empty love tank.”

“In a normal, functional family,” they write, “love is transmitted from generation to generation, poured down from parents to children.” If this does not happen, codependency, “a condition that results when love tanks are running on empty,” can occur.

THE TELL TAIL RESPONSE
How can you tell if you, or someone you love, is codependent? There are a variety of behavioral patterns you can watch for.

 Codependents try to fill their emotional voids with people, behaviors and things. Feeling empty inside and unhappy with their lives, codependents use people, behaviors and things to control or medicate inner feelings such as fear, unresolved anger or loneliness.

In a family in which one spouse has an alcohol or drug addiction, the other spouse is frequently dependent upon the person with the addiction. The non-addicted spouse sees the addict as “needing to be taken care of” and assumes responsibility for the addict’s feelings, thoughts and behaviors.

Codependents tend to control. In an effort to control their own emotions, codependents try to control the emotions and behaviors of those around them. What they can’t control, they worry about.

Codependents are motivated by the idea that if they could only get their partners to change, their problems would be solved. Their belief is that others can “make” them angry, happy or sad.

Accompanying the need to control is the feeling of fear. Codependents often fear another’s retaliation physically, emotionally or mentally. They also are paralyzed by thoughts of being abandoned and left alone to handle life’s issues. They minimize their problems, trying to believe the lie that “things aren’t really so bad.”

Codependents become so enmeshed in another’s life and problems that they lose their own sense of identity and self-worth. Constantly looking to others for validation, codependents seek approval at all costs and will do whatever is necessary to please others. The wife of a sex addict may be extremely cautious about crossing her husband, for example, because she fears that if she makes him mad, he’ll look at pornography.

Codependents often lack the ability to set clear boundaries–not knowing when to say yes and when to say no to themselves and others. Fuzzy boundaries are a symptom of low self-esteem. They stem from negative thought patterns such as “If I say no, they won’t like me.” Such constant devaluing prevents an accurate assessment of true strengths and weaknesses, which is the basis for healthy self-esteem and the key to setting healthy boundaries.

 Codependents excuse, tolerate and cover up the bad behavior of the person they are dependent upon, even when it is habitual or extreme. Have you ever known a wife who “calls in sick” for an alcoholic spouse with a hangover, or a husband who continues to make the payments on credit card accounts for a spouse who’s a compulsive shopper? Codependents enable rather than help correct the bad behavior.

FINDING THE ROOT OF THE PROBLEM
The issues connected with codependency are so complex that helping a codependent through the healing process is difficult. I usually begin by identifying what the factors were, from active abuse to subtle neglect, that prevented the person’s love needs from being met. I determine how these painful events affected him in the past and how they are affecting him now. Then I help him come to terms with his past and begin to make better choices for the present and future by showing him how to work through the grief process (denial, anger, depression, bargaining and acceptance).

One common hindrance to the healing process is the codependent’s stubborn defense of his dysfunctional family-of-origin. Often a codependent will pretend things “weren’t that bad” and find looking inward very painful. I often hear, “My parents did the best they could.”

Though that may be true, it is necessary for the codependent to see that suppression of a painful past has resulted in his present problems. If he wants to complete the grieving process and receive the healing he so desperately needs, he has to get out of denial.

When codependents refuse to face the reality that past events have hurt them, they “re-create” the past by repeating patterns of behavior under a compulsion to fix their dysfunctional families. In psychology we refer to this as “unfinished business.”

For example, if the emotional needs (love, acceptance, significance) of a daughter were not met because her father was caught up in sexual addiction, she likely will re-create her childhood by marrying a man who is a sex addict to “finish the business” of getting her love needs met. The result, of course, is only the perpetuation of unmet needs.

In facing the “unfinished business” of our pasts, we do not blame or attack our parents. The goal is to try to understand how the way we were raised has affected and may still be affecting us.

FREEDOM
As with all of life’s challenges, the solutions to codependency are found in God’s Word. The Bible tells us in Genesis 1:27 that “God created man in His own image” (NIV). It goes on to say, “God saw all that He had made, and it was very good” (v. 31).

This passage of Scripture is telling us that our “original” family-of-origin is God’s family and that we, a part of what God created, are “very good.” We are not forever bound by an earthly family’s dysfunctions when we realize who our true Father is! This is good news for the codependent.

The only perfect parent is our Father God, the one who created us. As we come to know Him, we learn to trust Him to meet our deepest inner needs, and we exchange the chaos of our lives for His peace.

The apostle John tells of a Samaritan woman who had been with six different men in an attempt to have her innermost emotional needs met. It was only when Jesus introduced her to her true Father that she came to realize all her needs could be met in Him (see John 4:14).

Like the Samaritan woman, the codependent must learn some things about God: that His love is unfailing, that He never abandons us, that He is patient and kind, even when we make mistakes, that He always tells the truth, that He always keeps His promises, that He always listens and acts on our behalf–and most of all, that He accepts us just as we are and considers us beautiful.

The Bible’s help to those who feel the need to control others is self-control, which is a fruit of the Spirit (see Gal. 5:22). God’s grace enables us to live self- controlled lives (see Titus 2:11-12). The apostle Paul tells us in 1 Cor. 6:12 that he “will not be mastered by anything.” Like him, when we are in control of our own feelings and behaviors, we can give to others out of a position of strength, not weakness.

Note that doing someone a favor is not a sign of codependency. Doing good when you freely choose to do it is from godly strength. But doing for others what we cannot do, do not wish to do or cannot afford to do is motivated by weakness and is not of God.

Dealing with unclear boundaries and low self-esteem becomes easier when we know who we are in Christ. Then we do not base our success on the acceptance or approval of others.

Jesus did not struggle with His identity. He knew exactly who He was (see John 4:25-26). We need not struggle with our identity or purpose, either. First Peter 2:9 declares that we “are a chosen people, a royal priesthood, a holy nation, a people belonging to God, that [we] may declare the praises of Him who called [us] out of darkness into His wonderful light.”

Knowing who we are in Christ makes us powerful in Him. In Colossians 2:9 we read, “For in Christ all the fullness of the Deity lives in bodily form, and you have been given fullness in Christ, who is head over every power and authority.”

In Christ, we are children of God (see 1 John 3:1). We have His attributes and strengths within us. That means we do not have to fear anyone or anything.

We are free to say no without feeling guilty and yes without feeling angry. We are not constrained by fear of abandonment or retaliation. We can confront others in a loving, yet powerful manner. And if they respond negatively, we can hold them accountable with godly consequences.

Breaking free from codependency begins with learning the facts about it and getting help. Codependency will not improve over time. Even if circumstances appear to be better for a season, happiness will be incomplete and temporary.

Extreme codependency can lead to severe depression and even suicide, as well as increasingly poor physical health, especially if addictions to substances are involved. Wounds from the past will become strongholds for pain, bitterness and unforgiveness. And the lives of innocent victims may be in danger.

If you are involved with someone who is codependent, seek professional help. Educate yourself. Read books. Attend support groups. Remember, you are not powerful enough to change anyone–only God can do that. It is the Son who sets us free (see John 8:36.)

But He is more than able to accomplish what needs to be performed–to sanctify the codependent “through and through” and to keep his spirit, soul and body “blameless at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ” (1 Thess. 5:23). “The one who calls you is faithful,” the Bible says, “and He will do it” (v. 24).

 

The battle for your mind: Sadly, too many loose what goes on between their ears.

 

Since we refute arguments and theories and reasoning’s and every proud and lofty thing that sets itself up against the true knowledge of God; and we lead every thought and purpose away captive into obedience of Christ. 2 Corinthians 10:5 Amp.

Sounds great but how many of us take every thought captive? How about if we refuse to listen to the negative lies suggested to us many times throughout the day and night.

Science explains that the mind is located inside the brain.  The brain is the hard drive and the mind is the software, so to speak.  Satan uses evil spirits and fallen angels to control humanity and his main target is the human mind.  If he gains control of the mind he can control the rest of the person.  The mind is the only thing in the world a human can control 100%.  The legendary heavyweight boxing champion, Joe Louis once said; “Kill the body and the head will fall.”  In Christianity, it is the opposite; “Kill the head and the body will fall.”  Satan uses two types of spirits (lying spirits and fear demons) to control people (saved or unsaved).  They almost always work in the same order; the lying spirit strikes first and the fear demon attacks second. 

  • The lying spirit injects a thought (usually negative) into the mind from his hiding place in the unused portion of the brain (Mt. 9:32-33, 12:22).

  • The fear demon usually hides in the stomach or chest area and waits to see if the person will receive and believe the lie or negative thought.

  • If the person receives the thought, the fear spirit will  attack the soul (creating negative emotions) or body (creating pain) which reinforces the lie as truth.

If the person takes the thought given to them captive, the fear demon will strike the soul or body first giving the person negative emotions, feelings or pain.  Once the person labels them, it becomes true to that person.

For example; a negative thought is emitted into the mind from the lying spirit in the brain such as “You will always be alone.  No one likes you.”  Once the person receives and believes the injected thought, the fear spirit attacks the soul and the person “feels” loneliness, fear, rejection, etc.  They are now in bondage.  If the fear demon strikes the soul first and causes the negative emotions to arise in the body, the person labels it “I feel so alone.”  “Everyone rejects me.”  They are now in bondage.

Jesus said “You will know the Truth and the Truth will make you free.  If the Son shall make you free, you shall be free indeed.”  Once the person learns thru discernment, to reject the lying emotions and thoughts, the spirits lose their power and can easily be cast out.

The person can be cured of mental illness and chronic negative thinking patterns.  This is the root of what I call an Obsessive Compulsive Negative Thought Disorder.

No one can be set free from listening to lies.  They must be mentally renewed (Ephesians 4:23).  Only by receiving and believing truth can a person be loosed from the power of darkness (Luke 11:36).

Only the Holy Spirit can heal a wide range of mentally ill patients including schizophrenia and severe bipolar.  Understanding Satan’s methods of mind control is a major key to restoration.   Repentance is the key (Acts 3:19).  You can be free of Satan’s destructive control of your mind if you repent of receiving negative thoughts and emotions as you own, go through deliverance and re-new your mind on the Word of God (Ephesians 4:23, I Corinthians 2:16, II Corinthians 10:4-5, Philippians 2:5, I Peter 1:13, 4:1).

Why don’t Christian Drug, Sex & Alcohol Programs seem to work very well?

There are several Christian based treatment/rehabilitation programs throughout the country that are designed to help people, Christian and non-Christian, overcome their chemical addictions and live lives of sobriety and productivity.  Unfortunately, the effectiveness of these programs could drastically be improved by adding an essential missing ingredient.  Fortunately, most Christian based programs tend to demonstrate statistically superior success rates when compared to secular ones.  AA and NA experience approximately 85% to 97% relapse rates.  Treatment centers and hospital programs exhibit similar patterns.  The AMA estimates that up to 40% of all patients in general hospital beds in the U.S.A. are there for some problem related to chemical dependency.  Most Christian based programs have higher success rates for their graduates but also have significant drop out and relapse rates.  Typically, 50% to 85% of all patients that start a residential treatment program quit before completion. The Christian programs generally rely on educational tapes, sermons, guest speakers, strict discipline, videos, individual counseling, group therapy, Bible studies, chapel worship, family visits, work details, annual award dinners, recreation and fund raising activities.

My experience working in Deliverance, Inner Healing and Bible teacher in several of these types of programs for many years has allowed me to observe a dramatic missing ingredient:  The programs do not implement productive methods of dealing with unclean spirits.  Unclean spirits are the key tools Satan uses to cause life destroying addictions (drugs, alcohol, sex, food, exercise, gambling, money, etc.). They penetrate or infect the person’s brain and body (Mk. 5, Lk. 13, Mk. 1, Lk. 11, Dan. 4, Job 4, I Tim. 4:1-3) causing internal cravings and anxiety that the patient cannot permanently overcome and does not understand.  Program directors mistakenly think that chapel services, Bible studies, discipline training, prayer and Christian fellowship alone will correct the problem.  Unfortunately, it is incomplete because something miraculous is missing.  The Holy Spirit is the only person who can completely heal a person of an addiction.  He must be given freedom to move in, through and among the clients and patients.  He alone can cast out the demons of addiction and heal their bodies; allowing the person freedom to pray, learn and grow.  I have frequently seen many in rehabilitation programs who cannot be successful because they don’t know they have unclean spirits or they don’t know how to remove them.  Every addict is out of control and has unclean spirits.  Almost none of the treatment programs in the United States allow for teaching about unclean spirits and how to remove addiction demons.  It is a vast area of spiritual ignorance among Christian leaders.

I have personally seen many addicts and ministers delivered from demons who improved dramatically in treatment programs as opposed to those who constantly struggle because they have not been able to overcome their internal cravings given to them by the spirits in their bodies.  Relapsing is common.  Drop outs are common.  Unfortunately, most leadership in rehabilitation programs do not understand demons and are afraid to deal with them.  Many of the leaders are themselves infected with spirits from their own prior drug/alcohol usage.

What needs to be done?  

Restructure the programs:  Priority

  • (1) Genuine repentance and a born-again experience must be ascertained for EVERY new inductee.  I have personally led many men to the Lord for the first time in their lives who had been working a program for months or years.
  •  (2)  Cast out the unclean spirits of addiction.  If a person graduates and still has addiction demons in their brain or body they will probably relapse within few months.
  •  (3)  The Baptism of the Holy Ghost must be required before any patient graduates.  If the programs would give the Holy Spirit the preeminence, the relapse statistics would drop dramatically (Acts 2, 8, 10, 19).  Patients who do not have their own Heavenly prayer language are at significant risk for relapse.
  • With these implementations relapse rates will drop dramatically and a permanent cure of the addiction can be actualized.

House of Healing

Are you IN?

For IN Him we live, and move, and have our being; as certain also of your own poets have said, for we are also His offspring. Acts 17:28.  

 The Apostle Paul places emphasis on the fact as to where we are, and in whom live and have our being. The entire first chapter of Ephesians is laid out with this theme.

 1 Paul, an apostle of Jesus Christ by the will of God, to the saints which are at Ephesus, and to the faithful in Christ Jesus:

2 Grace be to you, and peace, from God our Father, and from the Lord Jesus Christ.

3 Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, who hath blessed us with all spiritual blessings in heavenly places in Christ:

4 According as he hath chosen us in him before the foundation of the world, that we should be holy and without blame before him in love:

5 Having predestinated us unto the adoption of children by Jesus Christ to himself, according to the good pleasure of his will,

6 To the praise of the glory of his grace, wherein he hath made us accepted in the beloved.

7 In whom we have redemption through his blood, the forgiveness of sins, according to the riches of his grace;

8 Wherein he hath abounded toward us in all wisdom and prudence;

9 Having made known unto us the mystery of his will, according to his good pleasure which he hath purposed in himself:

10 That in the dispensation of the fulness of times he might gather together in one all things in Christ, both which are in heaven, and which are on earth; even in him:

11 In whom also we have obtained an inheritance, being predestinated according to the purpose of him who worketh all things after the counsel of his own will:

12 That we should be to the praise of his glory, who first trusted in Christ.

13 In whom ye also trusted, after that ye heard the word of truth, the gospel of your salvation: in whom also after that ye believed, ye were sealed with that holy Spirit of promise,

14 Which is the earnest of our inheritance until the redemption of the purchased possession, unto the praise of his glory.

15 Wherefore I also, after I heard of your faith in the Lord Jesus, and love unto all the saints,

16 Cease not to give thanks for you, making mention of you in my prayers;

17 That the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of glory, may give unto you the spirit of wisdom and revelation in the knowledge of him:

18 The eyes of your understanding being enlightened; that ye may know what is the hope of his calling, and what the riches of the glory of his inheritance in the saints,

19 And what is the exceeding greatness of his power to us-ward who believe, according to the working of his mighty power,

20 Which he wrought in Christ, when he raised him from the dead, and set him at his own right hand in the heavenly places,

21 Far above all principality, and power, and might, and dominion, and every name that is named, not only in this world, but also in that which is to come:

22 And hath put all things under his feet, and gave him to be the head over all things to the church,

23 Which is his body, the fulness of him that filleth all in all.

Question, how many times do you see “IN”?

 

Fear, the Second Oldest Emotion Known to Man.

The first duty of man is to conquer fear; he must get rid of it, he cannot act till then. Thomas Carlyle Scottish Philosopher.

We all experience fear at some time in our life. Some of us have never had a moment of rest from this evil spirit of torment. First let me say fear was never, and is never given to us by our Lord.“For God has not given us a spirit of fear, but of power and love and a sound mind” (2 Timothy 1:7).

Adam and Eve were created in the image of God, perfect and holy, just like God was and is. At the exact moment Adam and Eve disobeyed God, innocence was lost forever. We have the account in Genesis 3:9,10, then the Lord called to Adam and said to him, “Where are you?” So he said, “I heard Your voice in the garden, and I was afraid (fearful) because I was naked; and hid myself.”

A lie from Satan was given a place in Eve’s heart. She chose to believe a lie more than she believed God and His commands Genesis 3:4,5. Satan has been busy using the weapon of deception and fear ever since.

The fear that came to Adam and Eve, knew where to attach itself in them, in their mind, that is the fight or flight area. God has given us fight or flight to alert us to danger so that we may respond by our fight or flight abilities in instances of fear for our self-preservation. The wages of sin are death (Romans 6:23) Adam experienced separation from God’s quickening Spirit and the loss of love from God and as a result, he felt fear as a torment.

Fear is the second emotion (a disturbance–excitement-a conscience mental reaction) mentioned in the Bible; in this verse is where fear entered the world, it is one of the oldest emotions known to man. The first emotion belongs to Genesis 2:25 which is shame.

Much of this world lives with fear daily. Every one of us has been subjected to fear. In that subjection we are not talking about fight or flight but a dreaded unclean spirit of fear that used God’s fight or flight as a means to harm us because it was given legal rights because of sin.

Fear is an evil spirit, not an emotion, fear will produce an emotion, a feeling of fear.

Two Dimensions of Fear.

Part one is the Spirit of Fear. It is a principality that has approximately 33 other spirits (See appendix) under its control, each one has a specific function and they all cooperate. This spirit wants to park itself in your soul and spirit so it can do its evil desires. Some of those desires that produce fruit are panic attacks phobias.

Fear is a phobia, the Bible says, Be not afraid of sudden fear, neither of the desolation of the wicked, when it cometh. For the Lord shall be thy confidence, and shall keep thy foot from being taken. Proverbs 3:25-26. What grips you is sudden fear, that is the panic attack. This type of fear is called a phobia. Another strong Scripture says, “But who hearkeneth unto Me, shall dwell safely and shall be quiet from fear of evil.” (Proverbs 1:33).

The Spirit of Fear can an often does come when we are in our mother’s womb. It can gain entrance from mom’s fear of dying while giving birth. Many are targeted because of God’s high calling on their life and this Spirit of Fear wants to keep these people from fulfilling God’s Destinyfear-tree in their life. (Ephesian’s 1:4).

We must not allow the ancestral line of curses and failures to run the course of our lives. We do not have to conform to our inherited spiritually. By faith in prayer you can drive the Spirit of Fear, out or have someone pray it out in Jesus name.

Part two includes the fruit of fear which can become part of you biologically. Through prolonged fear one’s mind can become programmed through long term memory (see Memes) and there does not have to be a Spirit of Fear present to accomplish this torment. Fear has been resident long enough to become biologically part of you so that any phobia can send you into fear.

Here is a brief description of what occurs. Many from their mother’s womb are attacked by a Spirit of Fear which plots and plans terror to be present all the while a person is growing up. Most Christians never consider the fact that their life has been preprogrammed by Spirit of Fear and other unclean spirits. We are all raised in a world controlled by Satan’s unclean ways. His imps constantly put disgusting thoughts that lead and drive us into sins. Our Adamic nature jumps right in with its lusts and on and on it goes.

By the grace of God, a person invites Jesus to be their Savior, this begins the walking out of our Salvation which is to be done daily (Philippians 2:13). We have to be converted from the old way of life to the new way of life in Christ Jesus. What has to take place is, new memories have to replace the old memories which are all based on lies and deception. In this process based on a relationship we learn how to live in the kingdom of God obeying God from our heart.

“Perfect peace belongs to those whose minds are fixed or settled on the Lord.” Isaiah 26:3. When you keep your mind renewed in the Word and your meditations on Him and bringing your mind and heart together they will affect a peace in your body unless you have issues that need to be addressed. We have to learn to fight the enemy long-term by the abiding peace within. Soon the reactions of fear will subside because the old programming broken.

You have to take back your life. To quote Watchman Nee “When you have done all, just stand.” In most deliverances there are certain things that must be dealt with before we can get to root issues, fear is one. We can all live fear free.